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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> the turkish prime minister has said that the war in syria will be over soon. he made the statement in a visit to refugee camps on the border. >> as fighting escalates in syria once more, turkey's prime minister predicts an imminent collapse of the regime. turkey is worried -- wary -- wearing -- weary too of violence spilling over and a growing tide of refugees if the conflict drags on. diplomatic activity attempts to wreakt -- break the stalemate and find a peaceful way out international envoy brahimi says a deal brokered by russia and the u.s. may be the only chance to prevent a sectarian war in syria. >> the situation in syria is very bad. very, very bad and the differences are increasingth >> but most syrians remain skeptical of brahimi's initiative. they say assad and those loyal to him should be discarded from any future deal. army troops have intensefied air strikes across the country. here in the eastern province, fighter jets bombed rebel strongholds. the military is stepping up its campaign to stop the rebels from advancing. there was been mass destruction on the eastern out skirts o
>> an end in sight? the turkish prime ministers as the conflict in syria could be over soon. the tribal policemen in pakistan and fights for his life after 21 of his colleagues are adapted and killed by the telegram -- taliban. the sectarian and divide. there continue to protest against the shia-led government. but the armored is of the moment there russian airliner crash lands on a road near a moscow airport. the turkish prime minister says the current glut in syria could be coming to an end very soon. -- says the conflict in syria to be coming to an end. these pictures appear to show fighters in an eastern damascus suburb. hashim, the turkish prime minister says the bloody conflict soon be over. why is he saying that? >> they have been saying about for the last few months. he said a dictator cannot stay in power by killing his own people. the news behind his statement is that there is a new syrian administration coming in very soon. maybe he is referring to the plans to establish an interim government when the conditions on the ground are there. they have a major concern.
leaders have often been at loggerheads over the fighting in syria. russia is one of damascus' key allies and turkey is one of its most vocal critics. >> just before the talk, shells landed in a syrian border town. in germany, chancellor angela merkel's christian democrats have begun meeting in hanover for a party conference looking ahead to next year's elections. >> merkel's party has been grappling with consensus -- contentious issues, including whether to give same-sex part ners the same privileges which married couples enjoy. and to reelect chancellor kohl as the next party chairman -- chancellor merkel as the party chair. what is in store for this congress? >> something like a coronation. angela merkel is expected to be announced as the candidate, with the -- with something like you expect to see in the chinese congress. she is expected to receive 90% backing or more. she remains germany's most popular politician. there are no rivals insight within the party. she is the undisputed leader of the cdu. you might even say she is the cdu's main message that begins -- and at the meeting th
in syria warning its collapse is near, almost imminent. now with the power vacuum suck middle east energy security into the chaos? we'll get answers next. >>> plus didn't think the government could throw money away into the wind and out to sea at the same time? oh, how wrong you are. details on a big new venture backed, by yes, your tax dollars. more "money" come being up ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it iso ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. sandra: is the syrian uprising taking a momentous turn? last threads of support for president assad looks to be unraveling. for the first time the russ
of the stability of syria's government came today from a russian diplomat and a nato official, saying the assad regime may be near collapse. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc g
. >> rebels on the advanced again. syria's capital shaken by blasts. a senior russian minister admits the assad regime is losing control. >> why one of the world's most famous museums is branching out. >> europe says one watchdog is enough to keep its biggest banks from ever collapsing and threatening the euro again. >> the european union leaders held an agreement that would tend banking supervision away from national governments and park -- would take banking supervision away from national governments. >> if the bank -- does need a bailout, all of europe will help foot the bill. >> the deal came after a prolonged deadlock over the details of the proposal. the german chancellor was full of praise for the outcome. but it's a good sign that the finance ministers agreed on a banking supervisor. it is a big step towards greater confidence and trust in the eurozone. >> countries like france and italy have pat -- have pushed for a speedy resolution. banking supervision paves the way for a direct supervision -- direct injection into ailing banks. >> it is no longer the sole responsibility of
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time becaus
there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poisonous gas on their own citizens. leland vittert lived from bethlehem in the west bank with more details. good day to you. >> reporter: good day. it's a little bit tear lee to figure out what may or may not have happened in terms of a report of a possible chemical weapons attack. right now we are seeing no serious split along religious lines inside that country. you can see it from the latest video. an air strike on what the rebels claim was a bakery line. when you look at this video it shows a lot of armed men in camoufla
more than 25 people. that does not mean we are against syria. we asked the government in syria, we asked the presidents al-assad in syria to explain this attack. >> hundreds fled their homes. some have found refuge in areas of the camp unaffected by the fighting but many others have left the town altogether. the world health organization said the main hospital has up to 100 people every day that have been injured and it is running short of medicine and other supplies. the most common injuries are gunshot wounds and injuries from -- the battle for the syrian capital has entered its second month. they maintained a firm grip on their power base in the center of the city. the rebels were able to advance. the fighting is not likely to end anytime soon. >> a gunman in pakistan have killed six women who were working to vaccinate children against polio. >> their job was to help stop the spread of a devastating disease, and they were killed for doing it. on tuesday, gunmen shot to death six pakistani women who were working on a government- backed polio vaccination campaign. five of the wome
kidnappers in syria, but many journalists have not been so lucky. >> the civil war in syria has made it the world's most dangerous place for journalists. at least 17 reporters and 44 blockers were killed there in 2012. the japanese journalist was one of them, killed in april during a clash between government troops and protesters. -- 17 reporters and 44 bloggers. both the assad regime and the opposition have silence -- have used violence to silence reporters. total of 88 journalists were killed worldwide this year, 1/3 more than last year. the most dangerous countries were syria, followed by somalia, pakistan, mexico, and brazil. in mexico, the drug wars between the cartels and the state continue to escalate, and journalists are often caught up in the crossfire. six reporters were killed for attempting to report on the drug trade, corruption, or human rights violations. >> egyptians go to the polls on saturday in a second round of voting on a draft constitution. opposition parties have been protesting against president morsi and his muslim brotherhood. democratic say it promotes an i
of repercussions for what is happening in syria, that violence may spill over into iraq. the prime minister was making reference to the turkish prime minister as well as the free syrian army. i sense there is some genuine fear among the iraqi officials, including the prime minister. finally, i think also there is some element of trying to divert attention by making such remarks. >> thank you very much for that. now to the package of spending cuts and tax increases that are supposed to boost the economy. not everyone agrees. politicians are bickering over the details. there is just no consensus. with the deadline looming, they are supposed to have it sorted by january 1. we report from washington. >> sundown on capitol hill in washington d.c. -- washington, d.c., and senate majority leader comes to the microphones to send everyone home until early monday morning, no deal imminent. the mother is still significant difference, but negotiations->> -- >> there is still significant difference, but negotiations continue. >> republicans sought late-day changes to social security in return for tax hi
or here at home? chris: welcome back. syria, egypt and afghanistan are just the foreign policy challenges we already know about russia out china and there which brings us to the big question this week -- will the president's second term triumphs be abroad or here at home? >> i think his second term will be defined by foreign policy and looming confrontation over iran. chris: politco has spoken. >> despite all of the domestic issues, he will have a bigger role to play on the world stage and brought into that with events whether it be syria, iran. >> leadership just changed in china for the first time in 10 years, the most important economic relationship we have in the world and he's got to make headway there to make sure they stay on their reform path so they continue to grow and the world economy will be stronger. >> i agree, it's unanimous, the big foreign policy challenges are coming at him. he can't avoid them. he's got to deal with iran, he's got to deal with syria, he's got to deal with afghanistan. chris: do we have a chance with iran? everybody worries about this -- do we have a ch
the delegates met in morocco, the so-called friends of syria from the u.s., european union, and various arab countries. more than 50 opposition groups formed the coalition last month. the friends of syria say the organization is now the lawful government. should step down.bashar assad delegates did not state whether they would provide weapons to the coalition. some are concerned that those weapons could fall into the hands of radicals. a spokesperson said that they believe their allies will help arm them if the situation changes. the leaders of russia and china continue to support the assad government. delegates from those countries did not attend the meeting. >>> 20 years after the u.s. closed its last military base in the philippines, u.s. troops are out toeturn inorce. top officials from the two countries have agreed to expand the u.s. military presence in the south china sea. the goal is to serve as a counterbalance to any potential chinese ambitions in the region. u.s. assistant secretaries of state kirk campbell took part in talks with philippine officials on maritime security and coop
approach to fiscal sanity. up next, is syria's president dancing with the del preparing chemical weapons? -- devil by preparing chemical weapons? ve kiwis. i've always had that issue with the seeds getting under my denture. super poligrip free -- it creates a seal of the dentures in my mouth. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. super poligrip free made the kiwi an enjoyable experience. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. >> bret: egypt's president went on national tv today to defend his perceived power grab. warn against any attempt to overthrow his government. mohammed morsi is calling for a national dialogue with the opposition this weekend. he also accused some opposition members working with mubarak regime. potential for more death in syria on a larger scale is growing tonight. chief washington correspondent james rosen has disturbing news about weapons of mass destructions. >> a regime helicopter calltur
ameritrade. example, of chemical weapons, nerve gas being used in syria which can literally wipe out thousands of people with one single weapon. the united states has been disengaged. the united states has said if we get engaged and intervene all of these terrible things will happen. everything they said would happen if we intervene have not happened because we didn't. there is an absence of american leadership in the region and i just came from a conference and i talked to these leaders. i know them well. they believe the united states is drawn and week. there are al qaeda training camps and to look at afghanistan where the message is we are leaving, you look at syria where 40,000 people have now been massacred, the upheaval in egypt, the consulate situation in benghazi is more dangerous than ever before and if america doesn't lead, then other people will lead and they are not in america's interest. >> here is the flip side of the argument, which is america used to have reasonably good relations with others. yes, they were dictators. yes they did despicable things. but as senator mc
for their allies in syria throughout that country's civil war, but a senior russian official says syrian president assad may be losing control. the deputy foreign minister said russians must accept the fact that government forces are losing territory. he said he could not rule out the possibility that opposition fighters bhimight win the sif w. they've beenalling for more talks, but u.s. president barack obama says they recognize the opposition coalition as the only legitimate representative of the people. the head of nato thinks president assad has his back to the wall. he said the government's collapse is only a question of time. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. >> he urged syrian leaders to stop the violence, understand the situation they're in and initiate a process that would lead to realizing theegitate aspirations of the syrian people. nato officials say they won't intervene militarily. they said it could destabilize the region. instead they will increase pressure by deploying interceptor missiles along the turkey border. aid workers is say more than a million peop
will appear before that panel. >> molly, thank you very much. and new developments over syria's vast stockpile of chemical weapons. the british foreign ministry is now confirming that the uk and the u.s. both have evidence suggesting that president al-assad in syria is using his government supplies including mixing chemical compounds and loading them on to bombs. syria is believed to have muss tared -- mustard gas and sarin. president obama said any attempt by syria to use chemical weapons against its own people will be met with consequence. >> and new developments in north korea as a planned rocket launch. the test fire was scheduled sometime on monday, but north korea's state media says scientists are seriously considering adjusting the time frame. meanwhile the u.s. is deploying warships to the region to monitor the situation there. north korea maintains it is just trying to put a satellite into orbit, but the u.s. says it is a cover for testing ballistic missal technology. >>> one week after a murder-suicide involving the kansas city chiefs player more sad news rocking the nfl. dallas cowb
here on wjz. >>> still ahead at 4:00, abducted in syria. a veteran reporter is freed after five days. what he's saying about his captivity. more funerals of the victims in the newtown, connecticut. >>> in the wake of what happened in connecticut, eyewitness news at,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> this is wjz tv, wjz hd, and wjz.com, baltimore. >> from the city, to the counties, to your neighborhood, now it's complete coverage. it's wjz. maryland's news station. >> it's 4:30, 51 degrees with a mixture of sun and clouds. hello everyone. i'm vic carter. >> children in new town, connecticut return to school for the first time as funerals for the victim continue. today families said their final good-byes to two more 6 year olds. james and jessica. tonight there will be a wake for victoria soto. one of several planned this evening. although other schools reopen. sandy hook elementary remains closed. inspire congress to pass tougher gun laws. much of the gun debate focuses on the rifle adam lanza used. the ar 15. >> more than 3 million americans own an ar 15. >> it's a fun gun to shoot. >> gun store owne
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
forced to delay a trip aimed at providing more support to the opposition in syria. clinton reportedly has a so many abstomach virus. she will take part with leaders on the syrian crisis. they recognize the syrian opposition as legitimate representatives of the people in that country. martha: accused colorado shooter james holmes is expected to be in court in under an hour today. this will be the first appearance for the man accused of killing 12 people in that horrific night in that crowded theater, and he reportedly tried to kill himself in his jail sell last month. alicia acuna live on this story from centennial, colorado. what is expected to happen in there today? >> reporter: good morning, martha. james holmes defense team is asking the judge to sanction the prosecution over leaks to the media, specifically that notebook we've heard so much about that james holmes sent to his university of colorado psychiatrist. defense attorneys charge that it was the prosecution that leaked the contents, and is calling witnesses today to track who handled it once it was discovered in the school's ma
to violence especially in syria. >> may peace be for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which has not spared even the defenseless and reached innocent victims. >> ifill: pilgrims also flocked to the holy land for christmas mass in bethlehem's church of the nativity believe to be the site of the jesus' birth. to the east in iraq security was tight outside a church in baghdad. armed police searched everyone who arrived for the christmas day service in a bid to prevent attacks by islamic militants. but sectarian violence did erupt in nigeria for the third christmas in a row. gunmen killed at least five worshippers in the northeast where the radical islammist sect has staged repeated attacks. back in this country, memories of violence and loss were still fresh in newtown, connecticut. as townspeople filled trinity episcopal church on christmas eve. the pastor focused on the youngest worshippers ten days after a gunman killed 20 students and six adults at an elementary school. >> i just want to ask how you are. are you good? >> yeah. are you okay? are you doing
is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live on, what shall i do with democracy? >> negotiations remained deadlocked. it is hoped that a new climate treaty will come into force in 2020. no one can yet said what that will look like, but protesters are refusing to grin and bear it. >> earlier, we spoke to our correspondent. we asked whether there had been any progress at the conference. >> there is very little progress in terms of a new climate treaty, one that will bind all nations to cut their greenhouse gas emissions. there is little progress in terms of credit financing -- climate financing. there were 2.2 billion euros pledged to help with mitigation in poorer countries. today, we heard that germany followed suit and has pledged some 3.6 billion euros. for the poor countries, that is at least partly a success. bennett is europe still taking the lead and had ot
taken in. the conflict in syria, afghanistan, and iraq have led to a spike in their numbers. >> amnesty says that even if budgets are tight, europe needs to do more. >> fugitives from north africa headed for europe. the eu cozy for the agencyhas discovered the boat, but it does not mean they will provide assistance. many vessels are forced to turn around, and many could die. amnesty international criticizes the actions. >> they need to respect human rights more. time and again, people die because they are trying to reach a europe with boats that are not seaworthy. there is no cooperation between the states, but this would also be a task force context, but human rights violations are also taking place within the european union. despite anti-discrimination laws, they have little access to education or public services in several european countries. >> we need more than just words from the e you. brussels can launch proceedings over treaty violations and holds member states to account this way and other areas, but so far, not over discrimination a menorahs. >> amnesty international neverthe
, norman schwarzkopf. heather: major developments unfolding in syria. warplanes bombing their own people. as rebels say no to propose peace talks. live overseas with all this could mean to the united states. gregg: and fallout after the chief of the american protection agencies dust down. it is more than just your average run-of-the-mill resignation. a new scandal coming up next. heather: and another man pushed to his death in a new york city subway platform. details on the suspect and the intense urge coming up next. >> to think that they put somebody into the tracks is horrible. >> it is the last stop on the train. that is all they were telling people. people asked what happened. the conductor said he didn't know. they were not given any information off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quo
report into alleged human- rights violations and syria says there has been a dramatic increase in violence in the country's major cities and that the conflict is becoming increasingly sectarian in nature. it warns that more and more foreigners are joining both sides in the fighting. now to the ongoing controversy surrounding the attack on the u.s. mission in libya. today, representatives from the state department appeared before u.s. lawmakers. officials acknowledged that some very painful lessons were learned from the benghazi assault in which america's ambassador and three others died could this comes in the same week that a scathing report faulted management failures at the state department. in response, the head of the diplomatic security bureau resigned. what are those painful lessons that you think that the state department has learned from the attack. >> some of the lessons they have learned in their high-risk missions, they need to have more security. that is not as mean more security guards come it means better and tougher buildings and more importantly they need to lo
speak out on behalf of the a 16-year-old killed in yemen, born in denver. >> in other news from syria, reports have emerged that the young syrian filmmaker was killed on monday in the city of hams. he appeared on the show in december. at the time be as that we only use his first bid for security reasons. >> what i saw in the last week, it is starting to turn into almost a civil war. they are enforcing the locals to form an armed resistance to the regime forces. >> for more we go to charles glass, award winning broadcaster. he returned from syria last month. >> these massacres are a clear indication of how urgent it is to find -- to force both sides in the conflict, the opposition and regime, to negotiate a settlement, which would ultimately mean a change in regime, but certainly a transition period in an absence of that, you have the russian army government, the saudis, the guitarist, the that states, turkey, farming the opposition, which will only inflame the civil war. more massacres will then take place. >> we continue with our look back at 2012. to get a copy of today's show, go t
before you switch. visit progressive.com today. >>> another deadly bakery bombing in syria. nine people today are dead including six children killed in an air raid while waiting for bread. it is the second attack on hungry civilians in as many days. one of the most shocking single events of this conflict. syrian warplanes dropping bombs on a bakery in hama province. the aftermath here, more than 100 killed while waiting in line. this amid reports six rebel fighters died after inhaling white gas. we're not sure what it is. the opposition says canister bombs were thrown at dissidents in the embattled city of homs. mohammed jamjoom joins me from beirut and lakhdar brahimi met with syria's president. before we get to that meeting, let's talk about the bakery bombings, the opposition is saying essentially once a town is, quote, liberated and taken over by rebels, the government's dropping bombs on lines of civilians waiting for bread on purpose in order to terrorize themohammed. >> reporter: that's right. the syrian government is saying that as of yet what happened was the work of terrorists
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
: if there is further military action in syria, does that have any impact? guest: the pentagon would need funding for those things. when libya came up, the pentagon does what it is told to do and goes and fights and goes back to congress and says, "now you need to make us whole." in iraq, there were supplemental appropriations. the pentagon will do what it needs to do. it will go back to congress and say, now we need the money to make up for things we spend money on the war. host: this comes from twitter. guest: that is a tough question. i do not know. once you get up to major, lieutenant colonel, you are getting close to that number. they indoor tremendous hardships and often cannot buy a home because they are a mother around so much. there are a lot of sacrifices that goes on. host: scott in woodbridge, virginia. caller: good morning. i am a former marine and a military brat. my father retired from the navy. i have a long history of active duty. i think there is misinformation going on this morning. talk about $800 billion for the wars in the middle east. we spent double that on the stimulus pl
you. it's 7:14. new this morning reports from syria that at least 16 people were killed today by a bomb blast near a school. this is video of the blast site. the state news agency said a car packed with explosives exploded in a residential area. reportedly at least half of those killed are women and children. also this morning for the first time russia which is syria's most important ally said the syria president is increasingly losing control and the opposition may eventually win the civil war. >> there is an urgent demand from business executives from the federal reserve chairman to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. taxpayers are fed up with the delay. >> reporter: while democrats and republicans on capitol hill are digging in their heels, taxpayers say its time to compromise. take a look at this nbc wall street poll. 68% of democrats and 66% of republicans say its time to meet in the middle when it comes to spending cuts and taxing the wealthy and more than half of independent voters feel the same way. also federal reserve chairman demands a deal. he said the longer
taken hostage in syria. my doctor told me calcium is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. megyn: fox news alert on the fate of a u.s. marine locked up in mexico for months. we got a picture of him locked up inside of one of mexico's most dangerous prisons. his name is john hammer. shirtless and chained to a bed. we are told it was sent to his family from an anonymous mexican e-mail account. he faces charges for carrying this gun, a family heirloom, over the border. breaking earlier today a big group of businessmen inside the northern mexico pressed their own government for his release because they are worried about american tourists and making mexico attractive to us. a lot of americans are unhappy the way our marine is being treated by our so-called friend mexico. joining us, the parents of john hammer. a lot of americans are outraged by what's happening to your son. it seems somewhat clear he may have violated some mexican law about bringing the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)